Lifelong Dewey

Reading through every Dewey Decimal section.

Tag: nonfiction

507: Preparing Literature Reviews by M. Ling Pan

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507.2: Pan, M. Ling. Preparing Literature Reviews: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Los Angeles, CA: Pyrczak Publishing, 2003. 190 pp. ISBN 1-884585-27-2.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 500: Natural Science and Mathematics
  • 507: Education, research, and related topics
  • 507.2: Research and statistical methods

Ling Pan’s Preparing Literature Reviews is a book with a clear goal and purpose: help the reader write literature review. A literature review is a synthesis of available written or published material on a topic. For scientific articles, this is usually the first section of the article. Pan’s many guidelines, examples, and full models contain a wealth of information on the topic and if you are writing a literature review for the first time, pick this book up. After reading this one, I feel that if someone asked me to write a review tomorrow, I would be amply prepared for the task at hand. Burgeoning scholars needs to have this one in their arsenal of reference material. A very informative book.

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692: Hiring Contractors Without Going Through Hell by Ellis Levinson

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692.8: Levinson, Ellis. Hiring Contractors Without Going Through Hell: How to Find, Hire, Supervise, and Pay professional Help for Home Renovations and Repairs. New York: Walker & Company, 1992. ISBN 0-8027-7381-8.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 600: Technology
  • 690: Buildings
  • 692: Auxiliary construction practices
  • 692.8: Contracting

When you’re a homeowner, there are few things more daunting than the prospect of remodeling or house repairs. You can either go it yourself and invest a lot of time in YouTube videos and gumption, or you can rely on the services of contractors. Ellis Levinson’s Hiring Contractors Without Going Through Hell deals with the reality, and sometimes the surreality, of dealing with the latter situation. He uses humor and sometimes a fatherly hand to help guide the reader through a bevy of contractor-related scenarios.

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383: Orphans Preferred by Christopher Corbett

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383.1430973: Corbett, Christopher. Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express. New York: Broadway Books, 2003. 255 pp. ISBN 0-7679-0692-6.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 380: Commerce, communications, and transportation
  • 383: Postal communication
  • 383.1 Mail handling
  • 383.14: Transportation systems, collection, and delivery
  • 383.143: Overland mail
  • +0973: United States

We know this much is true: In 1860, the business trio of Russell, Majors, & Waddell set about to revolutionize overland mail delivery in the United States. Backed by a congressional blessing (but not by congressional money), they sought to deliver mail to the citizens of California faster than ever before. Normally, mail took anywhere from one to six months to go from the East Coast to the West Coast, but the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Company strove to cut that down to ten days. From the moment the first rider struck from St. Joseph, Missouri, the Pony Express became steep in folklore and American myth. Christopher Corbett’s Orphans Preferred tries to wrangle truth from the mouth of history to get to the most accurate picture of the Express he can.

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478: Learn Latin by Peter Jones

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478.2421: Jones, Peter. Learn Latin: A Lively Introduction to Reading the Language. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1997. 169 pp. ISBN 0-7607-0842-8.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 400: Language
  • 470: Italic and Latin languages
  • 478: Classical Latin usage
  • 478.2: Structural approach to the classical Latin usage
  • 478.24: For persons whose native language is different
  • +21: For persons whose native language is English

Latin is by default an odd language. No speaks it anymore, but knowing it is considered a sign of erudition, and the countless books for learning Latin out there speak to a demand for learning the language. One of the many problems with Latin is that it is incredibly compact and nuanced. Changing the order of the words, the endings of verbs, or even missing a single letter changes the entire meaning of what is being said. Peter Jones’s Learn Latin is a rather interesting approach to learning the language that deserves a closer look.

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728: The Not So Big House by Sarah Susanka

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728.37: Susanka, Sarah. The Not So Big House: A Blueprint for the Way We Really Live. Newtown, CT: Taunton Press, 2001. 194 pp. ISBN 1-56158-611-0.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts and Recreation
  • 720: Architecture
  • 728: Residential and related buildings
  • 3: Specific kinds of conventional housing
  • 37: Separate houses

For a while there, people wanted large houses—big kitchens, big vaults, big bedrooms. But now, with a greater social awareness and rapid population comes the thought that there might be a limit to how much living space a person actually needs. Sarah Susanka’s The Not So Big House takes a look at how living spaces can be modified or built to accommodate a whole range of needs without becoming sprawling ranch houses.

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060: Robert’s Rules of Order by Henry M. Robert

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060.42: Robert, Henry M. Robert’s Rules of Order Revised for Deliberative Assemblies. Chicago: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1943. 307 pp.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 000: Computer Science, Knowledge, and General Works
  • 060: General organizations and museology
  • 060.4: Special topics of general organizations
  • 060.42: General rules of order

If you’re running even a halfway-serious meeting, assembly, or convention, you need some way of bringing order to the proceedings. Without common rules, deliberative assemblies devolve into chaos. First devised in 1876 by U.S. Army Colonel Henry Martyn Robert, these rules help to allow groups of peoples to understand what happens when, when people can speak, when and how motions can be voted on, and how to decide on many complicated matters.

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563: The Star-Crossed Stone by Kenneth McNamara

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563.95: McNamara, Kenneth J. The Star-Crossed Stone: The Secret Life, Myths, and History of a Fascinating Fossil. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2011. 2312 pp. ISBN 978-0-226-51469-7.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 500: Science
  • 560: Paleontology and paleozoology
  • 563: Miscellaneous fossil marine and seashore invertebrates
  • 563.9: Echinodermata and Hemichordata
  • 563.95: Echinozoa

In March 1887, a grave was discovered in England. It was an old grave, the interred had been there for thousands of years. But the two occupants weren’t the only creatures there: they had been buried with hundreds of fossilized sea urchins. Historians and archaeologists were puzzled. Why were these fossils buried with the ancient humans? What was their significance? Kenneth McNamara’s The Star-Crossed Stone looks into the discovery, history, and folklore surrounding fossil urchins.

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