Lifelong Dewey

Reading through every Dewey Decimal section.

Category: 780s

786: The Amazing Jimmi Mayes by Jimmi Mayes

DDC_786

786.9092: Mayes, Jimmi with V.C. Speek. The Amazing Jimmi Mayes: Sideman to the Stars. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2014. 166 pp. ISBN 978-1-61703-916-4.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts and Recreation
  • 780: Music
  • 786: Keyboard, mechanical, electrophonic, and percussion instruments
  • 786.9: Drums and devices used for percussive effects
  • +092: Biography

Jimmi Mayes is one of those great touring and studio musicians that no one has heard of. He doesn’t even have a Wikipedia article. But in 1960, at the age of 18, he was taken on the road to play with almost all of the great blues and soul artists of America. You can hear his work on the tracks of Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, James Brown, Martha Reeves, The Flamingos, Little Richard, The Four Tops, Marvin Gaye, and even Jimi Hendrix. While his heyday was in the 60s and 70s, he still tours occasionally and helps new people find the blues music he hold so dear.

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780: Mozart by Paul Johnson

DDC_780

780.92: Johnson, Paul. Mozart: A Life. New York: Viking, 2013. 155 pp. ISBN 978-0-670-02637-1.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts and Recreation
  • 780: Music
  • +092: Biography

Paul Johnson’s new biography of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is certifiably adjective-y. It’s short, sweet, inspiring, exasperating, jam-packed, opinionated, whimsical (at times), terse, and fun. For the most part, it’s a straightforward chronology of Mozart’s life and work. He only lived for 35 years (1756-1791), but produced the most interesting, most complex, most wonderful pieces of classical music in history. Starting at age five, he composed over 600 works, ranging from masses to concertos to operas to choral pieces to symphonies and everything in between.

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785: Roll With It by Matt Sakakeeny

DDC_785

785.0650976335: Sakakeeny, Matt. Roll With It: Brass Bands in the Streets of New Orleans. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013. 192 pp. ISBN 978-0-8223-5567-0.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 780: Music
  • 785: Ensembles with only instrument per part
  • 785.065: Jazz ensembles
  • +0976335: Orleans Parish, Louisiana, United States

Perhaps one of the best known cultural products of New Orleans outside of beignets and Mardi Gras is the jazz ensemble. Countless aspiring musicians gather there to truly understand the music and their craft. Matt Sakakeeny’s Roll With It travels alongside these ensembles in Post-Katrina New Orleans and tries to get inside the culture that pervades the city. He follows three different bands—Hot 8, Rebirth, and The Soul Rebels—as they deal with everyday issues and continue to raise the caliber of jazz music. A lot of the narrative focuses on jazz funeral processions and their impact on the social landscape, and while death forms an unnerving backdrop to the story, it’s the lives of the artists that make it interesting.

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782: God Bless America by Sheryl Kaskowitz

DDC_782

782.421599: Kaskowitz, Sheryl. God Bless America: The Surprising History of an Iconic Song. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2013. 154 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-991977-2.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts and Recreation
  • 780: Music
  • 782: Vocal music
  • 782.4: Secular forms of vocal music
  • 782.42: Songs
  • 782.42159: Alma maters (songs)
  • 782.421599: National anthems

In 1917 or 1918 (nobody really knows when), a man wrote a simple song. He was an immigrant from modern Belarus. He was drafted into the US army at the age of 29 to help fight World War I. But first he was asked to boost morale by composing an all-soldier revue of song, dance, and revelry. He had already had a bit of success as a Tin Pan Alley writer and Broadway composer, so the army decided to put his talents to good use. The revue, entitled Yip Yip Yaphank, did very well and everyone enjoyed themselves, but the composer didn’t use all the songs he had written. He tucked the rest away for later.

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787: One Woman in a Hundred by Mary Sue Welsh

DDC_787

787.95092: Welsh, Mary Sue. One Woman in a Hundred: Edna Phillips and the Philadelphia Orchestra. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2013. 210 pp. ISBN 978-0-252-03736-8.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 780: Music
  • 787: Regular and bowed string instruments (Chordophones)
  • 787.9: Harps and musical bows
  • 787.95: Frame harps
  • +092: Biography

January 7, 1930 was a cold but momentous day in the world of orchestral music. Leopold Stokowski, a giant of the music scene and conductor of the now world-renowned Philadelphia Orchestra, came by the apartment his old friend Carlos Salzedo to hear one of his students give an audition. Salzedo, a virtuoso at the harp, had cultivated a group of promising musicians at his studio. While there was nothing tremendously groundbreaking about auditions with Stokowski, this one was different. This was a first. Seated at the harp was Edna Phillips, soon to be the first woman to be a principal player in a major U.S. orchestra. Mary Sue Walsh’s One Woman in a Hundred gives us all the details.

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788: Beyond a Love Supreme by Tony Whyton

DDC_788

788.7165092: Whyton, Tony. Beyond a Love Supreme: John Coltrane and the Legacy of an Album. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2013. 112 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-973323-1.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 780: Music
  • 788: Wind instruments
  • 788.7: Saxophones
  • 788.7165: Jazz saxophonists
  • +092: Biography

Recorded on December 9, 1964, John Coltrane’s A Love Supreme is a central work in the history of jazz music. Considered by many to be his magnum opus, this album (and probably Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue) represented the height of composition done at the time. Tony Whyton’s Beyond a Love Supreme interprets the album, the man, the context, and the philosophy of jazz in 1960s.

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781: Killing Yourself to Live by Chuck Klosterman

781.660973. Klosterman, Chuck. Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story. New York: Scribner, 2005. 235 pp. ISBN 0-7432-6445-2.

Dewey Construction:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 780: Music
  • 781: General principles and forms of music
  • 781.6: Traditions of music
  • 781.66: Rock ‘n’ roll
  • +0973: United States

Armed with 600 CDs, Chuck Klosterman is sent on a road-trip across the United States to visit the places of rock mortality—the buildings, fields, and memorial sites where members of the rock ‘n’ roll community met their untimely end.

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