Lifelong Dewey

Reading through every Dewey Decimal section.

Category: 710s

715: Landscape Plants by Ferrell Bridwell

DDC_715

715: Bridwell, Ferrell M. Landscape Plants: Their Identification, Culture and Use. Albany, NY: Delmar Thompson Learnings, 1994. 525 pp. ISBN 0-8273-6017-7.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 710: Civic and landscape art
  • 715: Woody plants in landscape architecture

Ferrell Bridwell’s Landscape Plants is exactly what it advertises. Bridwell catalogs all the plants that can be used in outdoor landscaping, plain and simple. While the book is essentially a catalog of plants, there is a fair amount of discussion on which plants are more commonly used than others, how to arrange materials to create an appealing landscape, and which plants grow better in different geographic locales. The book focuses more on the decorative appearance and care necessary for the plants, so don’t expect too deep a discussion of plant biology and morphology. There are, however, sections on each plant dealing with pest control, growth rates, and many other maintenance subjects. If you’re looking to landscape your own property or need some answers to questions you have about your foliage, this is a very good book to turn to. It’s not a page turner, but rather a fairly decent reference tool.

718: Last Landscapes by Ken Worpole

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718: Worpole, Ken. Last Landscapes: The Architecture of the Cemetery in the West. London: Reaktion Books, 2003. 199 pp. ISBN 1-86189-161-X.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 710: Civic and landscape art
  • 718: Landscape design of cemeteries

“Architecture in Western Europe begins with tombs,” Ken Worpole tells us. His Last Landscapes is a prescient look into the proliferation and metamorphosis of graveyards, cemeteries, churchyards, and burial sites over the last two millennia. From the simple burial mounds of England’s early inhabitants to the ornate sculptures of Victorian graves, Worpole’s discussion of Western cemeteries is complex, nuanced, and beautiful. To understand places like these, you have to see them, and there are plenty of photographs of modern and classical graveyards and mausoleums included in this book. The author writes about death, burial, and landscapes from many angles—cultural, social, artistic, and personal. While his travels to various cemeteries are centered around England, he goes to the Netherlands, North America, and Italy to look at burial architecture in a more global light. Journeying into Eastern architecture would have made this volume a great deal larger, but I think that contrast would have made the book that much richer. All in all, though, this was quite an interesting book.

712: The Hermit in the Garden by Gordon Campbell

DDC_712

712.09: Campbell, Gordon. The Hermit in the Garden: From Imperial Rome to the Ornamental Gnome. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2013. 210 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-969699-4.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 710: Civic and landscape art
  • 712: Landscape architecture and design
  • +09: History

At some point during the European Renaissance (no one knows for sure when), a curious trend started. Men of religion or of means built themselves a small shack in the countryside with the barest essentials and lived out their days in solitude and reflection. The hermits could either live in the vast acreage of a nobleman or by a monastery. Their lives were devoted to prayer, reading, communing with nature, writing, or gardening. Then, England got a hold of the practice and it took on a life of its own. While it does explore the European roots of the phenomenon, Gordon Campbell’s The Hermit in the Garden mainly chronicles the rise and fall of English hermitages and how they existed in (and just outside) British society, culture, and literature.

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719: The English Park by Susan Lasdun

719.320942: Lasdun, Susan. The English Park: Royal, Private and Public. New York: Vendome Press, 1992. 203 pp. ISBN 0-86565-131-0.

Dewey Construction:

  • 700: Fine Arts
  • 710: Civic and landscape art
  • 712: Natural landscapes
  • 712.32: Public parks and natural monuments
  • +09: Historical, geographical, or persons treatment
  • +42: England and Wales

My pace is reading has slackened of late for a single reason: The Olympics. Every two years (I watch both the Summer and Winter Games), whatever project I’m working on comes to a standstill as I sit in my living room, eyes transfixed on the television, watching the best athletes in the world do amazing things. Even in the midst of arguably the largest project of my life, this year is no exception. So…it took me eight days to read a 200-page book. That is almost unheard of.

But—to the book at hand!

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