Lifelong Dewey

Reading through every Dewey Decimal section.

Category: 370s

379: Turn Away Thy Son by Elizabeth Jacoway

DDC_379

379.2630976773: Jacoway, Elizabeth. Turn Away Thy Son: Little Rock, the Crisis that Shocked the Nation. New York: Free Press, 2007. 362 pp. ISBN 978-0-7432-9719-6.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 370: Education
  • 379: Public policy issues in education
  • 379.2: Specific polcy issues in public education
  • 379.26: Educational equalization
  • 379.263: School desegregation
  • +0976773: Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas, United States

In September 1957, nine students attended their first day at Little Rock Central High in Little Rock, Arkansas. Normally, this wouldn’t have made for national news, but these nine students were African-American and they were the first ones to ever attend this school. They were surrounded by a military escort and news cameras. Elizabeth Jacoway’s Turn Away Thy Son is an in-depth look at the political and social atmosphere that pervaded the decision to desegregate Arkansas schools.

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375: The Struggle for the American Curriculum by Herbert Kliebard

DDC_375

375.00973: Kliebard, Herbert M. The Struggle for the American Curriculum: 1893-1958. New York: Routledge, 1995. 252 pp. ISBN 0-414-91013-7.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 370: Education
  • 375: Curricula
  • +0973: United States

If you’ve ever heard a parents talking about their child’s education, then you have at least encountered one person who thinks there is a better way to teach children. Trying to implement a curriculum that will have better and lasting effects on so many students is perhaps one of the hardest tasks there is. Teachers have to deal with countless varied personalities and an ever-increasing knowledge pool. From the 1890s onward in America, educators, philosophers, and legislators have tried to steer the course of education, and Herbert Kliebard’s Struggle for the American Curriculum traces each school of thought to see how they fared.

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370: Youth, Education, and Marginality by Tilleczek and Ferguson

DDC_370

370: Tilleczek, Kate & H. Bruce Ferguson, eds. Youth, Education, and Marginality: Local and Global Expressions. Waterloo, ONT, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013. 247 pp. ISBN 978-1-55458-634-9.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 370: Education

This is another one of those books that I will trudge through and no one will get very excited about. Editors Kate Tilleczek and H. Bruce Ferguson, in Youth, Education, and Marginality, bring together a collection of essays on social reform and education to highlight the issue of youth marginalization in Canadian schools. Their goal to pair both professionals’ views with that of the children themselves to show that while both groups understand the issues, it is up to everybody else to help them overcome them.

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378: Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

DDC_378

378.12092: Albom, Mitch. Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson. New York: Doubleday, 1997. 192 pp. ISBN 0-385-48451-8.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 370: Education
  • 378: Higher education
  • 378.1: Organization and activities in higher education
  • 378.12: Faculty and teaching
  • +092: Biography

Today’s review is going to be a short one. The only reason for that is that this book has already been read by millions of people, each with varying opinions of it. I won’t try to convince you of one perspective or the other.

Years ago, when author Mitch Albom was a derelict in college, he was befriended by a wonderful sociology professor who took him under his wing. After three years of tutelage and guiding him to a honors thesis, Prof. Morrie Schwartz became more than a teacher—he became a friend.

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371: Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson

371.82209549: Mortenson, Greg and David Oliver Relin. Three Cups of Tea: One Man’s Mission to Promote Peace… One School at a Time. New York: Penguin, 2007. 331 pp. ISBN 978-0-14-303825-2.

Dewey Construction:

  • 300: Social Science
  • 370: Education
  • 371: Schools and their activities
  • 371.8: Students
  • 371.82: Specific kinds of students
  • 371.822: Women
  • +09549: Other jurisdictions in Southeast Asia

While climbing K2 in 1993, Greg Mortenson had to rescue three climbers stranded near the top. Due in part to his own fatigue and the strain of additional climbing, he never reached the summit himself. As he struggled to climb down from his base camp, he ended up in the Pakistani village of Korphe. During his time there convalescing, he noticed that the local girls were attending a school with barely any walls, dirt floors, and no teachers. In repayment for their hospitality, he promised to build them a school. And so began a two-decades’ long humanitarian mission.

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374: Reading with Oprah by Kathleen Rooney

374.22: Rooney, Kathleen. Reading with Oprah: The Book Club that Changed America. Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press, 2005. 212 pp. ISBN 1-55728-782-1.

Dewey Construction:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 370: Education
  • 374: Adult Education
  • 374.22: Groups (including reading and discussion groups) in adult education

Everyone who reads has an opinion about Oprah’s Book Club. Its very properties made it impervious to ambivalence. A popularized women’s television show was picking books for America to read and discuss. The guru of self-esteem and self-improvement was trying to get America reading again (as if they had stopped). Either you loved the act of seemingly altruistic literary stewardship or you deplored the populist “dumbing down” of her literary analysis. From 1996 to 2002 (the first incarnation of Oprah’s Book Club), Oprah picked books for her audience to read and relate to. For each of these picks, she would sit down to a dinner with the author and a few select viewers to discuss how the book affected their lives and made them feel.

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