Lifelong Dewey

Reading through every Dewey Decimal section.

Category: 350s

351: Great Government Goofs by Leland H. Gregory

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351.0207: Gregory, Leland H. Great Government Goofs: Over 350 Loopy Laws, Hilarious Screwups, and Act-Idents of Congress. New York: Dell, 1997. 259 pp. ISBN 0-440-50786-3.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 350: Public administration and military science
  • 351: Public administration
  • +0207: Humor

Over the course of American history, thousands of people have been a part of its governance. Given that number of people over that long of a time, and you’re bound to encounter some strange incidents. Add state, county, and local governments and you have a sample size ripe for the picking. Leland H. Gregory’s Great Government Goofs packages a large assortment of these odd governmental occurrences for our quick amusement.

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350: Three Victorian Women Who Changed Their World by Nancy Boyd

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350.420922: Boyd, Nancy. Three Victorian Women Who Changed Their World: Josephine Butler, Octavia Hill, Florence Nightingale. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1982. 251 pp. ISBN 0-19-520271-6.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 350: Public administration and military science
  • 350.42: Public administration in England and Wales
  • +0922: Biographies of collected persons

Somehow in all my reading across myriad subjects, I seem to have never come across the fact that Florence Nightingale was British. In fact, she was born to British parents in Florence (hence her name). Nightingale, along with Octavia Hill and Josephine Butler, were instrumental in rise of feminism in Victorian England. Nancy Boyd’s Three Victorian Women Who Changed Their World chronicles the lives, efforts, and legacy of these three to show that Victorian England was not as backward and stodgy and folks tend to think.

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356: To Dare and To Conquer by Derek Leebaert

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356.1609: Leebaert, Derek A. To Dare and To Conquer: Special Operations and the Destiny of Nations, From Achilles to Al Qaeda. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2006. 596 pp. ISBN 0-316-14384-7.

Dewy Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Sciences
  • 350: Public administration and military science
  • 356: Foot forces and warfare
  • 356.1: Infantry
  • 346.16: Troops having special combat functions
  • +09: History

Almost everyone in the Western hemisphere knows the story of the Trojan horse. A small band of fighters hid inside a giant wooden horse left at the gates of Troy while the Greeks pretend to sail away. Once brought inside, the men crawl out of the horse and wreak havoc on the sleeping city. Throughout history, there are many stories of elite groups of soldiers outwitting, outfighting, or outflanking a much larger army. Whether through perfect subterfuge or simply engaging the enemy with better tactics, special operations forces often change the course of a battle, a war, and even history itself. Derek Leebaert’s To Dare and To Conquer is a voluminous catalogue of such forces and how their stories intertwine with both their culture and their history.

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357: Chariot by Arthur Cotterell

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357.1: Cotterell, Arthur. Chariot: From Chariot to Tank, The Astounding Rise and Fall of the World’s First War Machine. New York: Overlook Press, 2005. 298 pp. ISBN 1-58567-667-5.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 300: Social Science
  • 350: Public administration and military science
  • 357: Mounted forces and warfare
  • 357.1: Horse cavalry

There are two great inventions in the early history of humanity: writing and wheels. While writing helped transmit information from place to place faster, the wheel actually got people from place to place faster. Attach newly domesticated horses to the front of a basket with wheel and you have yourself a chariot. Early chariots were invented in Mesopotamia around 3000 BCE and they are seen in mosaic reliefs dated to five hundred years after that. They served as parade vehicles, battle taxis for archers, and used in races for public spectacle. For a while, they were the greatest weapons used in large-scale warfare, but strategists and inventors found ways around them. Forcing the battle onto uneven terrain or immobilizing the horses left the chariots unable to effectively take the field. Arthur’s Cotterell’s Chariot is a spectacular look into the history of, uses for, and stories about the first great war machine.

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355: The Art of War by Sun Tzu

355.02: Sun Tzu. The Art of War. Translated by Lionel Giles. London: Arcturus, 2008. 126 pp. ISBN 978-1-84193-358-0.

Dewey Construction:

  • 300: Social Science
  • 350: Public administration and military science
  • 355: Military science
  • 355.02: War and warfare

More than two thousand years ago, a humble servant of the King of Wu claimed to know the secrets to training a perfect army and winning battles. When the King asked him to prove his claims and train a harem of 180 concubines. He split them into two divisions and appointed one from each division to give orders. When the appointed leaders did, their respective armies ignored the orders and laughed among themselves. Sun Tzu ordered the leaders executed. Once they were, he appointed new leaders. And the armies obeyed immediately.

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352: Ask Not by Thurston Clarke

352.23860973: Clarke, Thurston. Ask Not: The Inauguration of John F. Kennedy and the Speech That Changed America. New York: Henry Holt, 2004. 216 pp. ISBN 0-8050-7213-6.

Dewey Construction:

  • 300: Social Science
  • 350: Public Administration
  • 352: General considerations of public administration
  • +2386: Inaugural addresses
  • +0973: United States (historical treatment)

On January 20, 1961, households across the US tuned in to what they thought would be yet another lackluster presidential inaugural address. What they heard would change them. At just under 14 minutes, it was the fourth shortest such address in history. But packed into the dense optimism was a sense of history. It charged the nation to be actively responsible for its future, to cull forth a sense of duty. And all this came from a man who just forty-three years old, the youngest man ever elected president—John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

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