Lifelong Dewey

Reading through every Dewey Decimal section.

Category: 020s

025: Essential Classification by Vanda Broughton

DDC_025

025.47: Broughton, Vanda. Essential Classification. Chicago: Neal Schuman Publishers, Inc., 2004. 293 pp. ISBN 1-5557-0507-3

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 000: Computer Science, Knowledge, and General Works
  • 020: Library and information science
  • 025: Operations of libraries, archives, and information centers
  • 025.4: Subject analysis and control
  • 025.47: Subject indexing

Every book in every library carries a small tag. That single tag helps to both define the subject matter of the text and arrange the book in the library. Often no bigger than a postage stamp, it is one of most defining characteristics of a library book. Before that tag can be placed, however, a librarian has to determine the subject of the book and how to classify it in the library’s system. Vanda Broughton’s Essential Classification is your local librarian’s best friend when it comes to the ins and outs of book classification.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

020: Foundations of Library and Information Science by Richard Rubin

DDC_020

020.0973: Rubin, Richard. Foundations of Library and Information Science, 2nd Edition. New York: Neal-Schuman, 2004. 571 pp. ISBN 1-55570-518-9.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 000: Computer Science, Information, and General Works
  • 020: Library and information sciences
  • +0973: United States

First of all, yes, this is a textbook, so it already loses points for excitement and story-telling. But, aside from that, if you want to learn the complete basics of library science, then Richard Rubin’s Foundations of Library and Information Science is a great start. I had the opportunity to study under Dr. Rubin at Kent State, so this book reminded me of that time a great deal. Reading it straight through in less than a week is not advised, however. It’s meant to be sampled and discussed over the course of three or four months. It gives a comprehensive history of all kinds of libraries (public, special, school, etc.) and their service to the public as well as new avenues (at least new in 2004) of growth, research, and technology. FRBR and massive online databases had finally matured somewhat, so an interesting amount of the material covers those. It’s a little dry, and the author tries to break up the monotony with a few jokes here and there, but it’s the passion of the author that stands out. Passages on the ethics and morals of libraries and librarians speak volume about where we are as a society and how information should be handled. If this is the textbook for your class, then you will have all the information you need about the field. A thick, educational book.

028: 12 Books That Changed the World by Melvyn Bragg

DDC_028

028: Bragg, Melvyn. 12 Books That Changed the World. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2006. 344 pp. ISBN 0-340-83981-3.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 000: Computer science, information, and general works
  • 020: Library and information science
  • 028: Reading and the use of other information media

Think about all the books you’ve read in your lifetime. Can you name just twelve that have truly changed your life? Which twelve books would make your list? Melvyn Bragg has an even harder task at hand. He has to pick twelve books that have not just changed his life, but the lives of the all the people on the planet. His 12 Books That Changed the World is a speculative look into just which tomes would make the list.

Read the rest of this entry »

027: Main Street Public Library by Wayne A. Wiegand

DDC_027

027.477: Wiegand, Wayne A. Main Street Public Library: Community Places and Reading Spaces in the Rural Heartland, 1876-1956. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Press, 2011. 180 pp. ISBN 978-1-60938-067-0.

Dewey Breakdown:

  • 000: Computer science, information, and general works
  • 020: Library and information sciences
  • 027: General libraries, archives, and information centers
  • 027.4: Public libraries
  • +77: North Central United States and Lake states

In an age where libraries are becoming more and more technical, where cybrarians are the new normal, and library services include everything from toddler’s story time to teenage game rooms to technical courses for the elderly but savvy user, it’s nice to look back at the beginnings of the institution. While libraries in America have been around since the Library Company of Philadelphia formed in 1731, patrons never really get a sense of the history of the building. Wayne Wiegand’s Main Street Public Library tries to wind back the clock and chronicle the beginnings of four typical libraries in America’s Midwest.

Read the rest of this entry »

022: The Book on the Bookshelf by Henry Petroski

As promised, here’s #4:

022.4: Petroski, Henry. The Book on the Bookshelf. New York: Knopf, 1999. 231 pp. ISBN 0-965-004552.

Where do you put books about bookshelves? Well, luckily, the Dewey has a place for them. In much the same way the Dewey has a classification for the Dewey itself, books on bookshelves are placed in the division for library science (the 020s). While one could make a decent case for classing it in the 600s with technology, bookshelves exist in relatively few domains. They’re in households, bookshops, and libraries. Since a lot of the history of bookshelves has been on how to make them for the masses (read “libraries”), their history falls under 022—Administration of physical plant (libraries).

Read the rest of this entry »